Not at your job, once that was good, things were simpler than a lot of the work we do in visual effects is kind of very broad, very strong, like a you, know, think about a monster screaming towards camera.

This was the complete opposite. There was very subtle stuff, so it's all like in the kind of micro details of the face. So the biggest challenge is that read the emotional performance, and in this case, since she was talking, so she was delivering lines.

Don't, you love me, we did free shots from the original movie. That was kind of like a proof of concept that our original or there are digital. Rachel was good enough and - and we showed we showed it to Denis the director and the studio, and they couldn't, really tell the difference and then or you know, they had to struggle to see which one was digital and that'S kind of when we knew that we had it in a bag and that there are Rachel was good enough to to hold up on a big screen.

We had a Sean Young on set in Budapest, so we Tweety scanned her and got a lot of photographic reference of her as well, and what that allowed us to do was to fit a digital skull inside the digital model we had of her when you age.

Obviously, your soft tissue drops down with gravity and you get wrinkles and so on, but your skull doesn't change, so your skull is pretty much the same, and what that allowed us to do was that we had a digital skull and we we Kind of built our 23 year old Sean Young from 1982 around at digital scales, so the cheekbones, the forehead, the chin, the nose so on.

We could kind of fit it around that digital skull, which was invaluable reference for us and that kind of ensured that we had a physically correct model. Sean Young's, real skull and we also captured performance double death.

So it's. Her body that's used in shots, a girl called Lauren Peeta. So we had a lot of kind of 3d data to work from, and the good thing about the 3d data is that we can, you know, rotate a row around it, a computer.

We can look at it from all angles when it come down to doing the actual performance. It was all hand animated, because basically Denis the director he wanted to base it direct. What we did like a normal performance like he would do one set with a regular actor, so we decided instead of doing the CAPTCHA route.

We decided to kind of use the capital data that we had as very valuable reference, but then all hand animated. So we basically created a lot of shapes, so basically all the things that we needed a human face to do, and then the animators you know very basically cannot dial it in to get like the performance that the nee wanted at the end of today, we can Make a still image look very, very photo real and good, but getting that believable animation that's, still the biggest challenge: [ Music ], not at your job, once that was good.

Things were simpler than a lot of the work we do in visual effects is kind of very broad, very strong, like a you, know, think about a monster screaming towards camera. This was the complete opposite.

There was very subtle stuff, so it's. All like in the kind of micro details of the face, so the biggest challenge is that read the emotional performance and in this case, since she was talking, so she was delivering lines don't.

You love me. We did free shots from the original movie that was kind of like a proof of concept that our original or there are digital. Rachel was good enough and - and we showed we showed it to Denis the director and the studio and they couldn't.

Really tell the difference and then or you know, they had to struggle to see which one was digital and that's kind of when we knew that we had it in a bag, and that there are Rachel was good enough to to hold up On a big screen, we had a Sean Young on set in Budapest, so we Tweety scanned her and got a lot of photographic reference of her as well, and what that allowed us to do was to fit a digital skull inside the digital model we had of Her when you age, obviously your soft tissue drops down with gravity and you get wrinkles and so on, but your skull doesn't change, so your skull is pretty much the same, and what that allowed us to do was that we had a digital Skull and we, we kind of built our 23 year old Sean Young from 1982 around at digital scales, so the cheekbones, the forehead, the chin, the nose so on.

We could kind of fit it around that digital skull, which was invaluable reference for us and that kind of ensured that we had a physically correct model. Sean Young's, real skull and we also captured performance double death.

So it's. Her body that's used in shots, a girl called Lauren Peeta. So we had a lot of kind of 3d data to work from, and the good thing about the 3d data is that we can, you know, rotate a row around it, a computer.

We can look at it from all angles when it come down to doing the actual performance. It was all hand animated, because basically Denis the director he wanted to base it direct. What we did like a normal performance like he would do one set with a regular actor, so we decided instead of doing the CAPTCHA route.

We decided to kind of use the capital data that we had as very valuable reference, but then all hand animated. So we basically created a lot of shapes, so basically all the things that we needed a human face to do, and then the animators you know very basically cannot dial it in to get like the performance that the nee wanted at the end of today, we can Make a still image look very, very photo real and good, but getting that believable animation that's, still the biggest challenge: [ Music, ]

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